STOP AND GO. The Art of Animated GIFs
In collaboration with smART
Domonkos, Dougherty, Fassone, Gannis, Scorpion Dagger, Mills, Passa and Okkult Motion Pictures.
19/12/2016
Start Exhibition
+
×
Exhibitions
STOP AND GO. The Art of Animated GIFs
Domonkos, Dougherty, Fassone, Gannis, Scorpion Dagger, Mills, Passa and Okkult Motion Pictures.
-
English Italiano -  

English

  Collaboration between asa nisi masa and smART — polo per l’arte is going on: we share common interest for digital world and our work is now converging. We are currently presenting STOP AND GO. The Art of Animated GIFs, curated by Valentina Tanni and Saverio Verini, previously on show in smART spaces in Rome (precisely until September 2016). The exhibition is now on show with a new setting, explicitly conceived for its web version. Here you can download exhibition catalogue. The critical texts that follow have been created for the exhibition held in smART — polo per l’arte from April 5th to September 30th 2016.  

Introduction

Our first exhibition in 2016 is yet another small turning point for us, as this is the first time we have presented a group exhibition in our gallery. STOP AND GO. The art of animated GIFs presents a number of works by eight different artists from Italy and North America who are some of the leading exponents of the genre on the contemporary international scene, namely: Bill Domonkos, Zack Dougherty, Roberto Fassone, Carla Gannis, James Kerr (aka Scorpion Dagger) Lorna Mills, Chiara Passa and Marco Calabrese & Alessandro Scali (Okkult Motion Pictures). Before discussing their work we wish to say a few words about the philosophy behind the exhibitions of smART – polo per l’arte. In these first three years of our activity we have always tried to present varied works representing a very wide range of artistic “languages”. These have included the digital art of Giacomo Costa, the paintings of Silvia Iorio, Federico Pietrella and Gabriele Picco and the sculptures of Aldo Grazzi and Michela De Mattei, coming now to our latest show dedicated to “post-internet” art.

The element of continuity within this progression, and its underlying theme, is our desire to capture and experiment what is happening now on the contemporary art scene, as if we were guided by a "periscope", without ever giving up the pleasure of indulging our own personal tastes.

So why did we decide to put on a show of animated GIFs? Because we wanted to focus on the explosion of the social phenomenon of GIFs on the web that has spread virally in recent years, involving a growing number of artists. It seems to us that by concentrating on this theme in the exhibition and in the initiatives that will accompany it we will be able widen the debate on art within the field of media communication and its critical potentialities. We are particularly interested in getting young people involved in this dialogue, as they are the main users of the web, and they are drawn towards experimentation also in the field of the arts. With this vibrant and dynamic exhibition we present an animated GIF cycle which will allow us to plumb the depths of the human condition and the history of Western culture, in ways that are sometimes funny and joking but sometimes also sharply perceptive. Some of the artists whose works will be on display use images that refer to classical iconography, so as to construct caricatured or irreverent situations, in which many social attitudes of our contemporary human existence – our conventions and ties, vanity and fears – are exasperated, offering an interpretation that traces connections and continuity between the past and the present. Other works we expose contain references to various topical issues that are rife in the world of digital communication, provoking intense and often discordant reactions. Obsessive images of childhood, insistent advertising, pornography, fashion and religious iconography are intermixed, so as to generate projections and experiences in the viewer that might relate to our feelings of anxiety, loneliness and our search for identity. But this is not all! This river in full flow can also be seen simply as a diversion, and played like a game, either alone or shared with others, as something that can evokes curiosity, fantasies and reflections and that can create a niche of thought in the frenetic currents of contemporary life. [Margherita Marzotto, President; Stephanie Fazio, Director of exhibition space]

Fragments of eternity

«How can it be that there are two times, past and future, when the past is no longer and the future is not yet? If the present were always present and did not pass into past time, then it would not be time at all, but eternity.»1 Sant'Agustine, Confessions

Someone has written that we are now experiencing a full “Animated GIF Renaissance”. This refers to the return onto the scene of a file format that seemed to be obsolete and doomed to oblivion, but also to the astonishing creative ferment that is accompanying it. It is a Renaissance in which everyone, not only the artistic community, is involved in a great collective game. Animated GIF s are an open and malleable platform, which is cross-sector and popular, cheap and accessible. They are easy to create, they weigh very little, they can be read by any web browser, and they thus perfectly embody the more open and democratic aspects of the Internet. They are used as a vehicle for comedy, irony and the surreal, but also as a linguistic element, like the betterknown emoticons. The so-called “reaction GIF s” that are now often used in online conversations can in fact strengthen the expression of emotions and moods and they are being used on a daily basis by millions of people on social networks, on chats and in emails. Much appreciated due to their brevity and directness, GIF s owe their great success also to their ability to continue to exist within a digital world in which the attention thresholds of users are getting lower and lower, and in which the capacity for prolonged concentration is becoming shorter by the day, as people are increasingly overwhelmed by continual overlapping stimuli. They are the perfect format for the present era of extreme multitasking.

«Animated GIFs have evolved into a kind of ubiquitous ‘mini-cinema’, entirely native to the personal computer and the World Wide Web», writes the artist Tom Moody, one of the pioneers of the genre. This reference to cinema is very relevant, especially due to the connection between GIF s and the various techniques used at the dawn of cinema, when experimentation with a limited number of frames was being widely conducted and mechanical devices with strange names like the thaumatrope and the phenakistoscope were being tested. This close association is evoked by one of the projects on display in the exhibition: the Giphoscope by Okkult Motion Pictures (Alessandro Scali and Marco Calabrese). This device, described by its creators as an “analog GIF player”, transforms short GIF animations on web pages into real three-dimensional objects, taking its inspiration from the Mutoscope, a machine that works on the same principle as the flip-book created by Herman Casler in the late nineteenth century. The frames are converted into sheets of paper and the sequence is activated by turning a handle. The work of US filmmaker Bill Domonkos, who re-elaborates and animates the images he uncovers in vintage black and white photo archives, also exists at the same intersection between the past and the present. His work has a strong aesthetic affinity with the atmospheres of experimental cinema, particularly those of Surrealism, which he recreates by maximizing the manipulatory possibilities of digital graphics. «An animated GIF is a loop and artists have been experimenting with film loops since the birth of cinema... I use loops in my films to extend or alter time and I look at GIFs as being an extension of [my video] work». This is a type of research that perfectly embodies a very widespread tendency in recent contemporary art: that of combining the most advanced technologies, such as virtual reality, with vintage techniques, so as to create hyper-modern images with a retro atmosphere. The reinterpretation of the classic images of art history is a similar operation of re-appropriation, manipulation and remixing, which is becoming increasingly widespread and often used by artists, photographers and advertisers, as well as anonymous experimenters. In an era in which images are more and more frequently shown without captions and utilized far from their original contexts, also great works of art can end up as image files, ready to be used just like any other; viewed, downloaded, modified and then uploaded once more. They are, above all, used to convey new messages that can be very distant from their original meanings. Carla Gannis, for example, decided to transform one of the most famous, mysterious and controversial works in the history of art: The Garden of Earthly Delights by Hieronymus Bosch, replacing the figures and religious symbols with one of the new icons of our time: emojis. The result is a pop collage in continuous movement that contains a razor-sharp criticism of consumer society, hidden behind its colourful and fun facade, and that can only be discovered when one looks closely and carefully at the hundreds of details. Equally irreverent is the Scorpion Dagger project of James Kerr, who is probably one of the best-known GIF artists today. His funny scenes and sketches, most of which are created by animating northern European early Renaissance paintings, transform the serious and prim atmospheres of these artworks into amusing dark comedies that mix the sacred with the profane and that ridicule various aspects of religion by means of the sharp and cutting weapon of visual irony.

The series of animated GIF s created by Zack Dougherty, aka Hateplow, instead deals with the relationship between death, spirituality and new technologies. His antique busts, photographed in museums and then scanned and rendered by means of a 3D computer graphics process, conceal surprises such as golden skeletons, like precious souls magically revealed inside the cold marble. Displayed between them in the exhibition, a human hand emerges from a pile of hard disk drives: a surreal image which could be seen as symbolizing abundance, as well as the volatile nature of digital information. The artist points out that «the perception is that these GIF s or digital stuff in general live forever once they’re online, which is true as long as we keep on backing them up and reproducing the stuff on new palettes and developing new technologies that last longer than 10 or 15 years. It can all be gone in an instant, which brings you back to stone and how powerful a stone statue is.» The work of Lorna Mills, who has pioneered the artistic use of GIF s ever since she started using them in 2005, is completely different. In those early years very few artists were willing to work in a format that was already considered obsolete and even restrictive, but these small groups of creative individuals managed to launch a movement that was destined to become much more popular and widespread. Those were the years of the so-called “surf clubs”: websites on which people shared their experiments, as well as the discoveries they had made during endless browsing sessions, mostly consisting of images, videos and animated GIF s. The web was beginning to reveal its darker and more bizarre facets to those who were willing to delve a little deeper into its convoluted recesses. This was a kingdom of the bizarre, the perverse and the peculiar: a realm characterized by the most varied and extreme diversity. Mills drew freely from this world of images and she inserted the fragments of videos and images she had found on the net into her GIF s, which were rigorously pixelated in order to emphasize their original form as compressed, low-resolution files. Hers is an aesthetic of dissonance that catches the eye and forces it to make the effort to decode the image, which seems simple and basic at first glance but which in reality is densely packed with details and meticulously assembled. Unlike many other GIF artists the Italian Roberto Fassone puts himself at the centre of his work. We see him magically levitating inside his own home in a very short and hypnotic loop that leaves him suspended in mid-air. His is an ironic, minimal and intimistic approach, which mixes various different sources of inspiration, such as the early forms of performance art, conceptualism, Pop Art and the cultures of Internet. Completing our overview of possible approaches to the format of the animated GIF is a work by Chiara Passa: a short geometric animation that plays with themes of visual perception and architectures of space. In this case geometry has distanced itself from its usual role as a factor of order. Instead it disrupts the space and the volumes that try to contain it. In the exhibition this fascinating GIF is projected onto a sculptural surface, thus radically changing our perception of volumes and boundaries, physical as well as digital. [Valentina Tanni]

How to go loopy for loops

«It takes a while until the “new” (insert video or digital) art becomes Art (with a capital A), integrated into thematic surveys and exhibitions that include all kinds of media. This doesn’t mean that the qualifier forever vanishes, but that the art form moves beyond the medium itself and the way in which it complements, augments and/or challenges traditional concepts of art.» Christiane Paul, Renderings of Digital Art, 2002

The image lies upon the screen. Immobile. At the centre of the frame a small circle with a dashed white outline bears the three letters: G I F. You have only to click on this image to activate it, and then it comes alive for a few astounding seconds. It suddenly ceases to be static and it leaps into life and movement, as in those action films of the eighties1 in which what had at first seemed to be a statue in the background suddenly lurches forward and attacks the protagonist from behind2. The movement of the image is repeated endlessly, or at least until you decide to click on it again and return it to its original immobility. Luigi Ghirri once said that «photography is a perfect synthesis between states of stillness and of motion»3. Who knows, perhaps if this famous photographer had witnessed the rise of GIF s he would also have used this phrase to refer to these kinds of images.

Actually, in the context of digital languages, the GIF is now considered an out dated and in some ways archaic format4 and at this point one should immediately clear the field of any potential misunderstandings: the animated GIF cannot be defined as a “new technology”, unless we decide to also include some much more recent devices in this category (for example USB flash drives arrived on the scene almost a decade later, but no one would dream of describing them as the “latest” technology). What is really new is the use of the GIF in social contexts. This is a phenomenon that has truly exploded in recent years (in 2012 the Oxford American Dictionary declared “GIF ” the word of the year5) and that is now at the height of its diffusion on social networks.

It is not easy to determine the reasons behind this uncontrolled explosion. Certainly animated GIF s have the gift (or should one say GIF t?) of synthesis, and in the context of the rapid and syncopated communication of social networks they often replace the written word, because they have all the vivid effectiveness of the visual image, added to that of movement6. This more “ontological” reason is linked with others, such as the possibility of instantly sharing them on Internet, the mania for the instant effect that is typical of all fashions and trends, and the desire to adopt a form of expression that, to some degree, adds a dose of creativity, humour and lightness to the communication. As is clearly shown by the existence of enormous online archives (above all giphy.com), there is a GIF to refer to virtually every situation or special occasion, and to express every mood. STOP AND GO certainly originates from the observation – not frightened at all but, if anything, impressed – of the social use and the massive spread of GIF s. However, the exhibition attempts to see the phenomenon from a different perspective: that of a group of artists who, through their conscious aesthetic attitude and their persistent practice, critically reflect upon or go beyond the stereotypes of the GIF s that we usually find on the Net, sometimes also by appropriating them. The potentialities of this medium and the mechanisms that regulate it have remained intact.

What has changed is the desire of these artists to distinguish themselves from the anonymous GIFs of unknown origin that can be fished from the immense sea of the web, and to express their own personalities and original ideas to a remarkable degree. All of the ingredients that make GIF s so irresistible are still there: their frequently grotesque qualities, the endless loop that soon becomes an obsessive repetition, the reference to “classical models” (whether these be works of art or early black and white photographs) intermixed with allusions to contemporary popular culture, the mediatory quality of GIF s as an ideal point of contact between the static and the moving image, and finally the automatism of the loop that, while evoking a process of industrial production, is actually a parody of this very process, as it appears to be an assembly line deprived of any function or purpose, so that the images it transmits become an end unto themselves. GIFs are even clumsy and awkward, usually with a short, almost imperceptible, moment of hesitation – a kind of stumbling – at the end of the sequence before it starts its next repetition.

The artists featured in STOP AND GO express all of these characteristics, each of them in his or her own way. Bill Domonkos uses archive images: photographs of other times that are animated by “special effects” – including the addition of sound – that provide these “vintage” GIF s with an alienating kind of elegance and a vaguely disturbing poetic quality. Zack Dougherty, with his customized frames, brings an almost hand-crafted artisanal dimension to the digital support, reducing its mass-produced qualities and “seriality” and turning it into a unique artwork. But these images that we view on our monitors – and that are something like a “vanitas” in motion – are anything but reassuring or “warm”. Instead they evoke a sense of death and decadence that conflicts with the vitality which we are accustomed to seeing in the GIF . The floating self-portrait of Roberto Fassone places the human figure at the centre of the work. The artist is suspended in mid-air like a superhero, but– not without a certain degree of irony – the domestic context puts this ongoing little “miracle” into perspective, by bringing it closer to the aesthetic of “Do It Yourself” and amateur videos. Carla Gannis instead refers to one of the great masterpieces of art, The Garden of Earthly Delights by Hieronymus Bosch. This famous triptych in the Museo del Prado of Madrid is re-interpreted by the addition of emojis7, which generate a sort of “avatar” of the painting, full of movements, variations and details to be explored, that make this GIF a kaleidoscopic universe of different signs, shapes and colours. The works of Lorna Mills are dominated by a convulsive and hybrid imagination, in which kittens, children playing, sportsmen in action and pornography coexist in a balance that is actually less precarious than one might expect. These profoundly different contents are united and somehow assimilated due to their pervasive presence on the Net. Mills dives deep into these contradictions, fabricating a collage of GIF s – in strictly low resolution – which highlights the perverse ways and the tremendous speed with which we feed on the images that circulate on the internet. The duo Okkult Motion Pictures, made up of Alessandro Scali and Marco Calabrese, stimulates a reflection on the passage – or rather on the return – from digital to analogical. The three Giphoscopes on show in the exhibition are activated by turning a crank to one side of the device: a mechanical action that reminds one of the seminal experiments of Eadweard Muybridge on the movement of images, as well as certain artifices of early cinematographic experimentation (indeed the conceptual origins of the GIF belong to this context of research). In this process of “remediation”8 the GIF acquires the physicality and plasticity that are typical of the installation. In a similar way, Chiara Passa has created a “sculpted” GIF with images projected onto an uneven and bumpy surface, which gives the GIF a three-dimensional spatial extension. The artist, in accordance with her usual practice, includes no human or anthropomorphic figures and she chooses to rely on geometric forms with an apparently icy and impersonal kind of abstraction: the work has a seductive and hypnotic effect as well as a strong visual impact. Scorpion Dagger (the name chosen by James Kerr for his activity as a “GIF artist”) draws liberally on Flemish and Northern European Renaissance paintings, the compositional style and attention to detail of which are maintained, while the scenarios of his GIFs are anything but austere and religious. Instead they are dominated by comic, grotesque and irreverent effects. The works of Scorpion Dagger – a figure who is practically worshipped on the Net, to judge by the number of shares and “likes” they receive on Facebook – are circular and episodic micro-stories, in which the characters – mostly religious figures – perform actions that are absolutely profane and secular, and where even Jesus Christ trades places with all-American teenagers.

I finally wish to answer two questions. Firstly: why should anyone organize an exhibition of GIF s if you can view them from the comfort of a computer screen in your own home, or anywhere on a tablet or a Smartphone? And secondly: can the GIF truly be considered a form of art? Regarding the first question, the challenge for us was to give a “body” to these works, putting them in relation with a physical space and offering the viewer an unusual user experience that is able to enhance the contents and specific qualities of GIF s. In answer to the second question, for those who still have doubts, the best answer comes from the opening quotation at the head of this text by the curator and digital art theorist Christiane Paul. GIF s possess a unique artistic grammar that is well worth analyzing and studying; one that is in perpetual balance between stillness and motion, technological precision and human precariousness: «Letting them slide one after the other [...] I observe that strange tingling: spasmodic jerks and jolts, little tics, an entire atlas of interrupted and repeated gestures [...]. Immersed in their routine, they seem untouchable, like sleepwalkers who cannot be awakened; and yet, somehow, I cannot help but think that in all of that frenetic agitation they are somehow gesturing to me»9. [Saverio Verini]

1 This happened in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984), the second film in the Indiana Jones tetralogy, as well as in Predator (1987). 2 Sometimes even the “good guys” use this tactic: As in Rambo First Blood II (1985), which is also the second film of the series. 3 M. Belpoliti, Tutto ciò che è solido si dissolve nell’aria, (All that is solid melts into air) in B. Pietromarchi (editor), vice versa, Mousse, 2013, p. 101 4 Animated GIF s were introduced onto the market by the American computer firm CompuServe in 1987. 5 To read more 6 For more on the "fight" between words and images in modern communication, go here. 7 For more on the "fight" between words and images in modern communication, go here. 8 A neologism coined by the US theorists Jay D. Bolter and Richard Grusin. For a discussion, see Jay D. Bolter, R. Grusin, Remediation: Understanding New Media, Cambridge, Mass. and London: MIT Press, 1999 9 T. Isabella, Il cinema al tempo delle GIF, Doppio Zero.


Italiano

Continua la collaborazione tra asa nisi masa e smART — polo per l’arte, i cui interessi legati al mondo dell’arte digitale si sono trovati più di una volta a convergere. Presentiamo, in una veste rinnovata e pensata appositamente per il web, la mostra STOP AND GO. L’arte delle gif animate, curata da Valentina Tanni e Saverio Verini, ospitata a Roma presso gli spazi espositivi di smART fino al settembre 2016. A questo link è disponibile il catalogo della mostra.

Quelli che seguono, sono i testi critici realizzati per la mostra ospitata dal 5 aprile al 30 settembre 2016 da smART — polo per l’arte.

Introduzione

La mostra che inaugura il 2016 è per noi un altro piccolo giro di boa: presentiamo per la prima volta nei nostri spazi espositivi una mostra collettiva. STOP AND GO. L’arte delle gif animate, si compone di un gruppo di opere di otto artisti provenienti dall'Italia e dal Nord America, tra i maggiori esponenti del genere sulla scena internazionale contemporanea: Bill Domonkos, Zack Dougherty, Roberto Fassone, Carla Gannis, Lorna Mills, Marco Calabrese & Alessandro Scali (Okkult Motion Pictures), Chiara Passa e James Kerr (Scorpion Dagger). Vale la pena spendere due parole sulla linea espositiva che anima smART – polo per l’arte. In questi primi tre anni abbiamo proposto linguaggi artistici molto diversi fra loro: l’arte digitale di Giacomo Costa, la pittura di Silvia Iorio, Federico Pietrella e Gabriele Picco e la scultura di Aldo Grazzi e Michela De Mattei, fino all’ulteriore passaggio che ci porta oggi alla mostra sull’arte “post-internet”. L’elemento di continuità di questo percorso, il suo filo conduttore, è la nostra voglia di captare e sperimentare, come guidati da un “periscopio”, ciò che si muove sulla scena contemporanea, senza rinunciare al piacere di seguire il nostro gusto personale. Perché una mostra sulle gif animate? Perché vogliamo mettere a fuoco l’esplosione del fenomeno sociale delle GIF sul web, che si è diffuso viralmente coinvolgendo un numero crescente di artisti. Ci sembra che soffermarsi sul tema con la mostra e con le iniziative che l’accompagneranno, possa allargare l’orizzonte del dibattito sull’arte nel mondo della comunicazione mediatica e sulle sue potenzialità critiche. In particolare ci interessa coinvolgere in questo dialogo i giovani, principali fruitori del web e più inclini alla sperimentazione anche in campo artistico.

Presentiamo dunque - con un allestimento vibrante e dinamico - un ciclo di gif animate con le quali ci si addentra, in modo a volte scherzoso a volte tagliente, nelle pieghe della condizione umana e della storia della cultura occidentale. Alcuni degli artisti esposti utilizzano immagini tratte dall’iconografia classica per costruire situazioni che appaiono caricaturali o dissacranti, in cui molti atteggiamenti sociali dell’uomo contemporaneo – convenzioni e legami, vanità e paure - vengono esasperati, proponendone una lettura che traccia una continuità tra presente e passato.

In alcuni lavori compaiono riferimenti a tematiche molto attuali che in qualche modo invadono il mondo della comunicazione digitale, suscitando reazioni intense e spesso discordanti. Immagini ossessive del mondo infantile, del martellamento pubblicitario, della pornografia, della moda, dell’iconografia religiosa, si mescolano suscitando nei fruitori proiezioni e vissuti legati a sentimenti d’inquietudine, di solitudine e di ricerca d’identità. Ma non solo! Questa corrente in piena può essere vissuta come un diversivo, alla guisa di un gioco solitario o condiviso capace di evocare curiosità, fantasie e riflessioni e di creare una nicchia di pensiero nel fluire frenetico della vita contemporanea. [Margherita Marzotto, Presidente; Stephanie Fazio, Direttore spazio espositivo]

Frammenti di eternità

«..di quei due tempi, passato e futuro, che senso ha dire che esistono, se il passato non è più e il futuro non è ancora? E in quanto al presente, se fosse sempre presente e non si trasformasse nel passato, non sarebbe tempo, ma eternità…» Sant'Agostino, Le Confessioni

Qualcuno ha scritto che siamo in piena “Animated Gif Renaissance”. L'espressione allude al gran rientro sulla scena di un formato di file che sembrava destinato all'obsolescenza, ma anche allo stupefacente fermento creativo che lo accompagna. Un Rinascimento che coinvolge tutti, e non soltanto la comunità artistica, come un grande gioco collettivo. Le gif animate sono una piattaforma aperta e malleabile, trasversale e popolare, economica e accessibile. Sono facili da realizzare, pesano poco e sono leggibili da qualsiasi browser, incarnando la quintessenza del lato aperto e democratico di Internet. Vengono utilizzate come veicolo di comicità, ironia e surrealtà, ma anche come elemento linguistico, al pari delle più note emoticon. Le cosiddette “reaction gifs”, inserite all'interno delle conversazioni online, sono infatti in grado di rinforzare l'espressione di emozioni e stati d'animo e vengono usate ogni giorno da milioni di persone sui social network, nelle chat e nelle email. Apprezzate per il carattere diretto e la brevità, le gif devono il loro grande successo anche alla capacità di resistere all'interno di un mondo digitale in cui la soglia dell'attenzione degli utenti è sempre più bassa, in cui la capacità di concentrazione si fa ogni giorno più breve, sommersa da stimoli continui e sovrapposti. Sono il formato perfetto nell'era del multitasking estremo.

“Le gif animate sono diventate una specie di ubiquo 'mini-cinema', interamente nativo del personal computer e del World Wide Web”, ha scritto l'artista Tom Moody, uno dei pionieri del genere. Il riferimento al cinema è molto pertinente, soprattutto per la connessione che le gif intrattengono con gli albori della tecnica cinematografica, quando si sperimentava con pochi frame e si testavano dispositivi meccanici dai nomi bizzarri come il taumatropio e il fenachistoscopio. Una connessione questa, che viene evocata da uno dei progetti in mostra: il Giphoscope di Okkult Motion Pictures (Alessandro Scali e Marco Calabrese). Il dispositivo, descritto dai suoi autori come un “analog gif player”, trasporta le brevi animazioni dalla pagina web alla tridimensionalità dell'oggetto, traendo ispirazione dal mutoscopio, un macchinario che funziona con lo stesso principio dei flip-book creato da Herman Casler alla fine dell'Ottocento. I frame diventano fogli di carta e la sequenza si attiva girando una manovella. Sulla stessa direttiva di incrocio tra passato e presente si colloca l'opera del filmaker statunitense Bill Domonkos, che attinge agli archivi fotografici per poi rielaborare ed animare le immagini. Il suo lavoro possiede una forte affinità estetica con le atmosfere del cinema sperimentale, in particolare quello surrealista, ricreate sfruttando al massimo le possibilità manipolatorie della grafica digitale.

«Una gif animata è un loop e gli artisti hanno sperimentato con il loop sin dalla nascita del cinema. Io li uso nei miei film per estendere o alterare il tempo e penso alle gif come a un'estensione del mio lavoro video». È un tipo di ricerca, la sua, che ben incarna una tendenza molto diffusa nell'arte contemporanea recente, cioè quella di mescolare le tecnologie più avanzate, come ad esempio la realtà virtuale, con quelle vintage; immaginari ipermoderni e atmosfere retrò. In questo filone si può inserire anche la reinterpretazione dei grandi classici della storia dell'arte: un'operazione di appropriazione, manipolazione e remix sempre più diffusa e adottata da artisti, fotografi, pubblicitari e utenti anonimi. In un'epoca in cui le immagini viaggiano sempre più spesso prive di didascalie e vengono fruite lontano dal proprio contesto di origine, anche le opere d'arte finiscono per essere dei file come tutti gli altri, pronti per essere visualizzati, scaricati, modificati e ri-uploadati. E soprattutto, utilizzati per veicolare nuovi messaggi, più o meno distanti da quello originale. Carla Gannis, ad esempio, ha deciso di confrontarsi con una delle opere più note, misteriose e controverse di tutta la storia dell'arte: il Giardino delle delizie di Hieronymus Bosch, sostituendo figure e simboli religiosi con le icone del nostro tempo: gli emojis. Un collage pop in continuo movimento che dietro la facciata colorata e divertente nasconde un'affilata critica alla società dei consumi, tutta da scoprire indagando le centinaia di dettagli. Altrettando dissacrante il progetto Scorpion Dagger di James Kerr, probabilmente uno dei gif artist più noti al grande pubblico. Le sue scenette, realizzate animando quadri di area nordica risalenti perlopiù al primo Rinascimento, trasformano le atmosfere serie e compassate della pittura antica in gustose dark comedies, mescolando sacro e profano e ridicolizzando alcuni aspetti della religione tramite l'affinata arma dell'ironia visiva.

La serie di gif animate di Zack Dougherty, conosciuto come Hateplow, affronta invece il tema del rapporto tra morte, spiritualità e nuove tecnologie. I suoi busti antichi, fotografati nei musei e poi scansionati e riprodotti con la grafica tridimensionale, nascondono scheletri dorati, come anime preziose innestate nel gelido marmo. Accanto a loro, l'immagine surreale di una mano umana che emerge da un ammasso di hard disk, simbolo dell'abbondanza ma anche della volatilità dell'informazione digitale. Scrive l'artista: «Si tende a pensare che le gif, e i contenuti digitali in genere, una volta online vivano per sempre, il che è vero soltanto fin quando continuiamo a salvarle e convertirle e sviluppiamo nuove tecnologie in grado di durare più di 10 o 15 anni. Tutto potrebbe scomparire in un istante, il che ci ricorda quanto sia potente una statua di pietra.» Di tutt'altro segno l'opera di Lorna Mills, tra i pionieri dell'uso artistico delle gif, che utilizza sin dal 2005. In quei primi anni erano pochissimi gli artisti disposti a confrontarsi con un formato considerato già antico e in un certo senso limitante, ma furono proprio questi piccoli gruppi a dar vita a un movimento che si sarebbe poi rivelato vasto e trasversale. Erano gli anni dei cosiddetti “surf club”, siti web su cui ci si riuniva per condividere le proprie sperimentazioni, ma anche le scoperte fatte durante interminabili sessioni di navigazione: immagini, video, gif animate. Il web iniziava a mostrare, per chi fosse stato disposto a scavare più a fondo nei suoi recessi, il suo volto bizzarro e oscuro. Un mondo fatto di stranezze, perversioni, peculiarità: il regno della diversità più varia ed estrema.

Da questo immaginario attinge a piene mani la Mills, che nelle sue gif - rigorosamente pixelate per sottolineare la loro natura originaria di file compressi e a bassa risoluzione - inserisce frammenti di video e immagini trovati in giro per la Rete. La sua è un'estetica della dissonanza, che cattura l'occhio e lo costringe a uno sforzo di decodifica dell'immagine, a prima vista semplice ed essenziale ma in realtà densa di dettagli e meticolosamente assemblata. Si mette invece al centro dell'opera in prima persona l'italiano Roberto Fassone. Lo vediamo levitare magicamente all'interno del proprio ambiente domestico in un loop brevissimo e ipnotico che lo blocca a mezz'aria, sospeso. Il suo è un approccio ironico, minimale e intimista, che mescola diverse fonti di ispirazione: la performance art storica, il concettualismo, la pop art e le culture di rete. A completare la panoramica dei possibili approcci al formato delle gif animate, c'è l'opera di Chiara Passa, una breve animazione geometrica che gioca con i temi della percezione visiva e dell'architettura dello spazio. La geometria in questo caso si allontana dal suo consueto ruolo di fattore ordinante e, al contrario, scardina lo spazio e i volumi che cercano di contenerlo. In mostra, la gif viene proiettata su una superficie scultorea, andando a modificare radicalmente la percezione dei volumi e dei confini, siano essi fisici o digitali. [Valentina Tanni]

Attenti al loop!

«Ci vuole un po’ affinché quella che consideriamo arte “nuova” (video o digitale) diventi Arte (con la A maiuscola), inclusa in mostre tematiche insieme a tutti gli altri media. Questo non significa che le categorie tendano a svanire per sempre, ma che le forme attraverso cui l’arte si manifesta superano il medium stesso e il modo in cui esso integra, espande e sfida il tradizionale concetto di arte». Christiane Paul, Renderings of Digital Art, 2002

L’immagine giace sullo schermo. Immobile. Al centro del frame, una piccola bolla dai bordi bianchi tratteggiati con impresse tre lettere: G, I, F. Basta un click per attivare l’immagine. Ed ecco che la figura rappresentata si anima, di solito per pochi secondi. Un movimento repentino e immediato che sottrae l’immagine alla staticità, come in certi film d’azione degli anni Ottanta1 in cui quella che sembrava una semplice statua inerte all’improvviso si stacca dallo sfondo e assale il protagonista alle spalle2. L’azione si ripete potenzialmente all’infinito, almeno finché non si decida di cliccare nuovamente sull’immagine, che tornerà così alla sua originaria immobilità. Luigi Ghirri disse che «la fotografia è una perfetta sintesi tra stati di quiete e di movimento»3. Chissà, se il celebre fotografo avesse assistito all’ascesa delle gif forse avrebbe riferito la stessa frase proprio a questo tipo di immagini. E pensare che, nell’ambito dei linguaggi digitali, la gif rappresenta ormai un formato datato, per certi versi arcaico4.

Conviene subito sgomberare il campo dagli equivoci: le gif animate non possono essere definite “nuove tecnologie”, a meno di non voler considerare tali anche dispositivi ben più recenti (per dire: le chiavette usb sono più giovani di quasi una decina d’anni e nessuno si sognerebbe di includerle tra gli ultimi ritrovati della tecnologia). Nuovo è piuttosto l’utilizzo sociale delle gif. Un fenomeno esploso in tempi recenti (nel 2012 l’Oxford American Dictionaries ha decretato “gif” parola dell’anno5) e che trova oggi nei social network il culmine della sua diffusione.

Non è facile stabilire le ragioni di quest’esplosione incontrollata. Di sicuro le gif animate hanno il dono della sintesi: nella comunicazione rapida e sincopata dei social network si trovano spesso a sostituire il linguaggio scritto, portando in dote l’icastica efficacia delle immagini6. A questo aspetto “ontologico” si possono affiancare altre motivazioni: l’immediatezza della condivisione offerta da internet, l’effetto-mania che accompagna tutte le mode e le tendenze, la volontà di ricorrere a una forma espressiva che, in qualche modo, assicura alla comunicazione un discreto tasso di creatività, ironia e leggerezza. Come testimoniano gli sterminati archivi online (su tutti giphy.com) esiste una gif per descrivere praticamente ogni situazione, stato d’animo, ricorrenza. STOP AND GO nasce senza dubbio osservando – per nulla spaventati, semmai ammirati – l’uso sociale e la diffusione massiccia delle gif. Tuttavia la mostra cerca di cogliere il fenomeno da un’altra prospettiva: quella di un gruppo di artisti che, attraverso una poetica consapevole e una pratica insistita, superano o riflettono criticamente – talvolta appropriandosene – sullo statuto delle gif che abitualmente troviamo in rete.

Le potenzialità e i meccanismi che regolano il mezzo rimangono intatti; a cambiare è la volontà da parte degli artisti di distinguersi dalle “gif di madre ignota” che si possono pescare nel mare magnum del web, manifestando un’autorialità e un’originalità spiccate. Gli ingredienti che rendono le gif irresistibili ci sono tutti: il loop incessante, che si trasforma ben presto in ripetizione ossessiva; il senso del grottesco indotto da alcune immagini; la citazione di modelli “classici” (opere d’arte, fotografie in bianco e nero di inizio secolo) e al tempo stesso di riferimenti legati alla cultura popolare contemporanea; la “medianità” della gif, punto di contatto definitivo tra immagine statica e immagine in movimento; l’automatismo del loop, che mentre evoca un processo di produzione industriale in realtà ne fa parodia. Una catena di montaggio priva di funzionalità, fine a se stessa e alle immagini che veicola; addirittura goffa, se si pensa al breve e quasi impercettibile momento di esitazione della gif – un “inciampo” – tra una ripetizione e l’altra.

Gli artisti di STOP AND GO pongono l’accento su questi caratteri. Ognuno alla propria maniera. Bill Domonkos recupera immagini d’archivio, fotografie d’altri tempi che vengono animate grazie ad “effetti speciali” – tra cui il sonoro – capaci di conferire alle sue gif “vintage” un’eleganza straniante e una poeticità vagamente perturbante. Zack Dougherty, con le sue cornici customizzate, riconduce il supporto digitale a una dimensione quasi artigianale, sottraendolo alla serialità e rendendolo un pezzo unico; ma le immagini contenute nei monitor sono tutt’altro che rassicuranti e “calde”, evocando un senso di morte e decadenza che confligge con la vitalità cui le gif ci hanno abituato. L’autoritratto fluttuante di Roberto Fassone pone la figura umana al centro dell’opera: l’artista è sospeso a mezz’aria come un supereroe, ma il contesto domestico in cui è calato ridimensiona – non senza ironia – il piccolo “miracolo” in corso, avvicinandolo più a un’estetica legata alla cultura del “Do It Yourself” e dei video amatoriali. Carla Gannis opta invece per la citazione di uno dei grandi capolavori dell’arte, Il giardino delle delizie di Hieronymus Bosch. Il celebre trittico conservato al Prado di Madrid è riletto alla luce delle emoji7, che generano così un “avatar” del dipinto, ricco di dettagli da esplorare, di movimenti e variazioni che rendono questa gif un universo caleidoscopico di segni, figure e colori. Le opere di Lorna Mills sono dominate da un immaginario convulso e ibrido, in cui gattini, bimbi che giocano, sportivi in azione e pornografia coesistono in un equilibrio meno precario di quel che ci potremmo aspettare: contenuti profondamente diversi tra loro, tuttavia assimilati dalla pervasività con cui appaiono in rete. Mills si tuffa in questa contraddizione, fabbricando un collage di gif – rigorosamente in bassa risoluzione – che mette in luce il carattere perverso e la velocità con la quale ci cibiamo delle immagini su internet. Il duo Okkult Motion Pictures, formato da Alessandro Scali e Marco Calabrese, stimola una riflessione sul passaggio – o meglio, sul ritorno – da digitale ad analogico. I tre Giphoscope presenti in mostra si attivano girando una manovella posta su un lato: un gesto che ci riporta alle sperimentazioni di Eadweard Muybridge sul movimento delle immagini e a certi artifici del cinema degli esordi (l’origine concettuale delle gif, in fondo, si può collocare proprio in quel contesto di ricerca). In questo di “rimediazione”8, la gif acquisisce una fisicità e una plasticità tipiche dell’installazione. In maniera simile, Chiara Passa propone una gif “scolpita”: le immagini sono proiettate su una superficie irregolare e accidentata, che conferisce alla gif una tridimensionalità e un’estensione spaziale. L’artista, in linea con la propria pratica, non presenta figure umane o antropomorfe, ma sceglie di affidarsi a forme geometriche e a un tipo di astrazione solo apparentemente algide: l’effetto ipnotico dell’opera è infatti seducente e di forte impatto visivo. Scorpion Dagger (nome scelto da James Kerr per la sua attività di “gif artist”) attinge a piene mani dall’arte fiamminga e nordica; lo stile compositivo e il gusto per il dettaglio sono gli stessi, ma le scene delle sue gif sono tutt’altro che austere, generando un effetto comico, grottesco, dissacrante. Le opere di Scorpion Dagger – oggetto di una semi-venerazione in rete, basti vedere il numero di condivisioni e “mi piace” su Facebook – si presentano come micro-storie circolari e autoconclusive, in cui i soggetti – perlopiù sacri – si ritrovano a compiere azioni decisamente profane, e dove perfino Gesù Cristo sembra essersi scambiato di posto con un adolescente nordamericano.

Due domande, in chiusura: perché organizzare una mostra di gif, se si possono visualizzare comodamente da un tablet, da uno smartphone o dallo schermo di un computer? Le gif si possono considerare “arte”? In merito alla prima questione, la sfida è stata proprio quella di dare un “corpo” a questo tipo di opere, mettendole in relazione con uno spazio fisico e offrendo all’osservatore un’esperienza di fruizione diversa dalla solita, in grado di valorizzare i contenuti e le specificità delle gif. Sulla seconda, per chi avesse dubbi, la miglior risposta arriva dalla citazione della curatrice e teorica dell’arte digitale Christiane Paul, riportata in esergo. Le gif rispondono a una grammatica unica e degna di essere studiata, in perenne bilico tra quiete e movimento, tra esattezza tecnologica e umana precarietà: «Lasciandole scorrere una dopo l’altra […], osservo quello strano formicolio: scatti convulsi, piccoli tic, un intero atlante di gesti interrotti e ripetuti […]. Immerse nelle loro routine, sembrano intoccabili, come sonnambuli che non possono essere svegliati; eppure, in qualche modo, non riesco a non pensare che in tutto quell’agitarsi mi stiano rivolgendo un cenno»9. [Saverio Verini]

1 Certamente è accaduto nel secondo episodio della tetralogia di Indiana Jones o in Predator. 2 Ma a volte sono pure i buoni ad adottare questa tattica: si prenda Rambo, anche in questo caso il secondo film della serie. 3 M. Belpoliti, Tutto ciò che è solido si dissolve nell’aria, in B. Pietromarchi (a cura di), vice versa, Mousse, 2013, p. 101 4 Le gif animate sono state lanciate nel mercato dalla società informatica statunitense CompuServe nel 1987. 5 Per un approfondimento si rimanda al seguente link. 6 Per un approfondimento sulla “lotta” tra parole e immagini nella comunicazione odierna si rimanda al seguente link. 7 Ecco di cosa parliamo quando parliamo di emoji, secondo Stefano Bartezzaghi. 8 Neologismo coniato dai teorici statunitensi Jay D. Bolter e Richard Grusin. Per un approfondimento si rimanda a Jay D. Bolter, R. Grusin, Remediation. Competizione e integrazione tra media vecchi e nuovi, Guerini e Associati, 2003 9 T. Isabella, Il cinema al tempo delle GIF, Doppio Zero.

+
×
Caption
Bill Domonkos
Zack Dougherty
Roberto Fassone
Carla Gannis
James Kerr
Lorna Mills
Okkult Motion Pictures
Chiara Passa
+
×
Caption
+
×
Caption
+
×
Caption
+
×
Caption
+
×
Caption
+
×
Caption
+
×
Caption
+
×
Caption